Review(s)

English

79 (4) 259-268

Title: 
Animal poisonings in Belgium: a review of the past decade
Author(s): 
V. VANDENBROUCKE, H. VAN PELT, P. DE BACKER, S. CROUBELS
Abstract: 
This review focuses on poisonings in companion animals, including horses, farm animals and wildlife,investigated and recorded during the past ten years at the Laboratory of Toxicology of the Faculty ofVeterinary Medicine (Ghent University) and the National Poison Centre in Belgium. The causative agents ofpoisoning incidents vary among the different species. The Laboratory of Toxicology of the Faculty ofVeterinary Medicine reports that the majority of poisoning incidents in companion animals, and especially indogs and cats, are due to contact with insecticides and pesticides, whereas horses are more frequently poisonedby plant toxins. Farm animals, on the other hand, are mainly intoxicated by heavy metals, toxic plants andagrochemicals. The Belgian Poison Centre reports that intoxications in companion animals are mostly withagrochemicals, household products and drugs, whereas in farm animals intoxications with agrochemicals area common problem. This review gives an overview of the most common causes of intoxication and theirassociation with the different animal species. In addition, some rare or difficult to diagnose intoxications aredescribed, which account for a small number of poisoning cases.
Full text: 
pp 259-268
Review(s)

79 (4) 247-258

Title: 
Het gebruik van glucogene precursoren in de voeding van hoogproductief melkvee (Dutch)
Author(s): 
M. HOSTENS, P. BOSSAERT, S. COOLS, A. DE KRUIF, G. OPSOMER
Abstract: 
Paper in Dutch
Full text: 
pp 247-258
Review(s)

79 (5) 367-380

Title: 
Quantitative microbial risk assessment: methods and quality assurance
Author(s): 
I. BOONE, Y. VAN DER STEDE, M. AERTS, K. MINTIENS, G. DAUBE
Abstract: 
Quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) is used to estimate the risk level of pathogens along thefood chain and to support management decisions for the reduction of food safety risks. The degree of credibilitythat can be attached to risk assessment results depends largely on the quality and quantity of the data, themodel structure and the assumptions made. Quality Assurance (QA) in QMRA is defined as the structurethat ensures that all the steps in the risk evaluation process are scientifically based so that the policy questionsbeing posed can be answered. Whereas sensitivity analysis and scenario analysis are generally applied inQMRA, formal methods for the evaluation of data quality, the critical evaluation of assumptions, structuredexpert elicitation, the checklist approach and peer review are rarely used in QMRA, even though they wouldimprove the transparency of the risk analysis process. An overview of QA methods for QMRA is presented.The degree of implementation of these methods should be proportionate to the stakes of the risk managementquestions and should be discussed in consultation between the risk assessors and the risk managers.
Full text: 
pp 367-380
Review(s)

79 (5) pp 359-366

Title: 
Het oriëntatievermogen van de reisduif (Dutch)
Author(s): 
L. CLAEREBOUT, L.A. BEERNAERT, A. MARTEL
Abstract: 
Paper in Dutch
Full text: 
pp 359-366
Review(s)

79 (5) pp 345-358

Title: 
Dental pathology in chinchillas
Author(s): 
V. DERBAUDRENGHIEN, A. VAN CAELENBERG, K. HERMANS, INGRID GIELEN, A. MARTEL
Abstract: 
Chinchillas are prone to develop a wide range of dental pathologies. The most common one is malocclusion,a condition in which the teeth are misaligned and/or incorrectly positioned in relation to one another.Odontomas, caries, tooth resorption, and periodontal and endodontic diseases have also been reported. Thisarticle presents an overview of the specific anatomy and the most common dental pathologies of chinchillas,including the various aspects of the clinical symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of these pathologies.
Full text: 
pp 345-358
Review(s)

79 (6) pp 445-451

Title: 
Metabolic programming: background and potential impact for dairy cattle
Author(s): 
M. KASKE, S. WIEDEMANN, H. KUNZ
Abstract: 
Metabolic programming is defined as a nutritional intrauterine and/or early postnatal stimulus or insultat a critical period of development with lasting or lifelong significance. Thus growth, milk yield and fertilityas decisive parameters for the productivity of ruminants are influenced not only by genetic and environmentalfactors, but also by epigenetics. In the past decade, knowledge of the impact of metabolic programming inhumans and rodents in their later lives has increased considerably. Despite striking differences between themetabolic systems of ruminants and those of monogastric species, metabolic programming has a markedimpact on the ruminant species as well. Especially during the first weeks of life, an adequate supply of nutrientsis pivotal. Recent studies have demonstrated the advantages of intensified feeding of the preweaning calf forachieving better performance in the resulting dairy cow. Further research will be needed to elucidate thepotential of specific tools to manipulate metabolic programming for the purpose of improving the productivityand fertility of cattle.
Full text: 
pp 445-451
Review(s)

79 (6) pp 436-444

Title: 
Fasciola hepatica bij het paard (Dutch)
Author(s): 
H. NELIS, T. GEURDEN, P. DEPREZ
Abstract: 
Paper in Dutch
Full text: 
pp 436-444
Review(s)

80 (1) pp 25-30

Title: 
Polyartritis bij zuigende biggen voorkomen, etiologie, behandeling en preventie (Dutch)
Author(s): 
L. PLUYM, F. BOYEN, P. DEPREZ, A. DE KRUIF, D. MAES
Abstract: 
Article in Dutch
Full text: 
pp 25-30
Review(s)

80 (2) pp 115-128

Title: 
Endocriene verstoorders: werkingsmechanismen en gevolgen voor de vruchtbaarheid van de veestapel (Dutch)
Author(s): 
E.M.L. PETRO, J.L.M.R. LEROY, I.G.F. GOOVAERTS, W. DE COEN, P.E.J. BOLS
Abstract: 
Paper in Dutch
Full text: 
pp 115-128
Review(s)

80 (2) pp 105-114

Title: 
Nuclear medicine: investigation of renal function in small animal medicine
Author(s): 
E. VANDERMEULEN, C. DE SADELEER, A. DOBBELEIR, H. R. HAM, S.T. VERMEIRE, H. VAN BREE, G. SLEGERS, K.Y. PEREMANS
Abstract: 
Kidney function investigations in veterinary medicine are traditionally based on blood analysis (bloodurea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine concentration) and / or urinalysis (urine specific gravity, proteinto-creatinine ratio or fractional excretion). Morphologic information is usually obtained by abdominalradiography or ultrasonography. However, when more specific information on the functionality of the kidneysis needed, nuclear medicine offers various tracers that specifically represent glomerular filtration rate, effectiverenal plasma flow or functional renal mass, sometimes combining functional and morphologic data. Theseprocedures can be based on blood sampling techniques (non-imaging methods), or data can be obtained usinga gamma-camera (imaging methods). The most commonly used radionuclides for the examination of kidneyfunction in small animal medicine are discussed in this review.
Full text: 
pp 105-114
Review(s)

Pages