Review(s)

English

74 (5) 330-339

Title: 
De nieuwe Belgische wetgeving over opleidingen proefdierkunde: een vergelijking met de Nederlandse wet- en regelgeving -Dutch
Author(s): 
F. MULKENS
Full text: 
pp 330-339
Review(s)

74 (6) 420-431

Title: 
Antivirale behandeling van rinotracheïtisvirus, immunodeficiëntievirus en leukemievirus infecties bij de kat (Dutch)
Author(s): 
E. NEIRINCKX, B. GARRÉ, H. NAUWYNCK, S. CROUBELS, P. DE BACKER, K. VAN DER MEULEN
Full text: 
pp 420-431
Review(s)

74 (6) 412-419

Title: 
Nieuwe inzichten in boviene enzoötische bronchopneumonie (Dutch)
Author(s): 
B. CATRY, J. GOVAERE, T. VANHOLDER, G. OPSOMER, A. DECOSTERE, F. HAESEBROUCK, A. DE KRUIF
Full text: 
pp 412-419
Review(s)

74 (6) 403-411

Title: 
Groeifactoren in zeugenmelk en hun invloed op het maagdarmstelsel bij de big (Dutch)
Author(s): 
M. OSTE, E. VAN HAVER, A. WEYNS, C. VAN GINNEKEN
Full text: 
pp 403-411
Review(s)

75 (1) 23-30

Title: 
Antibioticumresistentie in E. coli bij landbouwhuisdieren, hazen, septisch materiaal en oppervlaktewater in Vlaanderen -Dutch
Author(s): 
C. CASTELEYN, J. DEWULF, B. CATRY, A. DE KRUIF, D. MAES
Full text: 
pp 23-30
Review(s)

75 (1) 18-22

Title: 
Modern research in the reduced fertility of high yielding dairy cows: an innovative way of thinking
Author(s): 
JLMR. LEROY, A. VAN SOOM, A. DE KRUIF, G. OPSOMER
Abstract: 
It has frequently been reported that, along with continuously increasing milk production, dairy cow fertility has been declining. Maintaining the fertility of dairy cows is of capital importance for guaranteeing optimal milk yield and profitability. The endocrine pathways leading to this subfertility have been extensively investigated. However, disappointing fertilization rates and early embryonic mortality have recently been proposed as major factors in the problem of disappointing reproductive performance. It is suggested that oocytes and embryos are highly sensitive to any disruption in their environment caused by metabolic, dietary or other factors, which can have fatal consequences for final fertility. Because knowledge of the oocyte’s microenvironment and of oocyte and embryo quality in high yielding dairy cows is extremely limited, future research should concentrate on providing this missing knowledge.
Full text: 
pp 18-22
Review(s)

75 (2) 140-152

Title: 
Passieve en actieve immuniteit en vaccinatie bij lam en ooi (Dutch)
Author(s): 
H. VAN LOO, S. VERBERCKMOES, E. COX
Full text: 
pp 140-152
Review(s)

75 (2) 122-139

Title: 
Gastro-intestinal motility in horses: a practical overview of the therapeutic use of prokinetic agents
Author(s): 
C. DELESALLE, R.A. LEFEBVRE, J.A.J. SCHUURKES, L. LEFERE, K. VANSCHANDEVIJL, P. DEPREZ
Abstract: 
Equine practitioners often need to address problems associated with decreased gastro-intestinal motility in colic horses. Likewise, ileus is a notorious complication in horses that is predominantly seen after surgical intervention for small intestinal colic. Understanding the physiological mechanisms that are responsible for normal GI motility in horses and knowing which factors predispose horses to ileus, will help clinicians to better understand the clinical picture of a colic horse and to determine when and which prokinetic treatment should be chosen in any specific case. However, due to the lack of fundamental research, the knowledge of pharmacological activity pathways and therapeutic efficacy of prokinetic medication in colic horses is very fragmented. Often research results in other species are extrapolated to the horse, without any pharmacological evidence that enteral receptor populations that serve as pharmacological target to induce intestinal propulsion in these species are equally important in horses. A possible discrepancy in these receptor populations between humans and horses could partially explain the inconsistent clinical efficacy of human prokinetic agents such as cisapride, metoclopramide and domperidone in equine colic cases. Furthermore, due to the lack of large, double-blind multi-center clinical studies, the evaluation of the therapeutic efficacy of many prokinetic agents that are used in colic horses is very subjective. The lack of non-invasive techniques to evaluate gastro-intestinal motility in healthy and colic horses contributes to this subjectivity. As rule of thumb, it can be stated that for the treatment of stasis of the cranial part of the GI tract of horses, mainly lidocaine, metoclopramide and erythromycin should be used. In cases of colonic hypomotility, naloxone, neostigmine, erythromycin and lidocaine are the drugs of choice. With regard to sedation of colic patients, it should be mentioned that acepromazine and xylazine both will negatively influence GI motility to a lesser extent than the alpha 2 agonists detomidine and romifidine. However, in colic cases expressing shock and endotoxemia, the use of acepromazine is hampered by its pronounced hypotensive effects.
Full text: 
pp 122-139
Review(s)

75 (2)s 114-120

Title: 
Subfertility in high yielding dairy cows: how to bring science into practice?
Author(s): 
G. OPSOMER, J. L.M.R. LEROY, T. VANHOLDER, P. BOSSAERT, A. DE KRUIF
Abstract: 
The present article aims to ‘translate’ the current – mostly theoretical – knowledge on fertility disorders in modern high yielding dairy cows, towards the actual situation in the stable. While some detailed research has recently been done at our department to elucidate the association between a high level of milk production and the reproductive performance of the current dairy cow, the next challenge is to ‘translate’ this knowledge into practice and to offer possibilities and strategies to minimize the effects of the decrease in fertility. As the negative energy balance and general health status after calving are known to be paramount factors hampering fertility, it is apparent that avoiding both is among the most important preventive measures to be taken. Improvement of the energy status by achieving a high dry matter intake and the provision of optimal and well balanced nutrition during the transition period as well as during early lactation are key goals in this effort. To achieve these goals, we should not only calculate the rations on paper, but should also check in the stable to determine whether the calculated amount is really being consumed by the cows. Furthermore, veterinarians should use their ‘clinical eyes’ as well as other diagnostic tools to assess the general health status of the cows and to assess at which aspect of the process things are going wrong and need to be adjusted. Besides the control of the negative energy balance and health status, other management factors that need to be maximized include heat detection, cow comfort, insemination technique, time of insemination during estrus and sperm quality. Only if management is on a very high level can high milk production and good fertility be a feasible combination!
Full text: 
pp 114-120
Review(s)

75 (2)s 106-113

Title: 
Early embryonic mortality in modern dairy cows: causes, consequences and remedies
Author(s): 
W.W. THATCHER, A. GUZELOGLU, T.R. BILBY
Abstract: 
Lactating dairy cows experience a temporary infertility syndrome. There is a multiplicity of factors contributing to early and late embryonic losses. Some of these factors begin within the postpartum period in association with dynamic metabolic and condition changes of the cow. Other factors include uterine health, as the cow enters the breeding period. Programming the preovulatory period with optimal recruitment and growth of the follicle influences subsequent quality, viability and survival of the embryo via direct effects associated with quality of the oocyte and indirectly via endocrine regulation (i.e., follicle and corpus luteum function) of the oviduct and uterus. The maternal-embryo unit appears to be responsive to reproductive management as well as pharmaceutical and nutraceutical programs to enhance pregnancy rates.
Full text: 
pp 106-113
Review(s)

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