2000 - 69 (6)

Volume 69 (2000), nr. 6

69 (6) 445-457

Title: 
Houden van "bijzondere dieren" en "bijzondere dieren" houden (Dutch)
Author(s): 
A. DECOSTERE
pp 445-457
Review(s)

69 (6) 441-444

Title: 
Het onderzoek van dekhengsten: een opfrissertje (Dutch)
Author(s): 
F. VERSCHOOTEN, P. DEPREZ, T. DE CLERCQ, H. NOLLET, G. VAN LOON, C. DELESALLE, L. LEFERE, J. SAUNDERS
pp 441-444
In practice

69 (6) 435-440

Title: 
THE “POST-WEANING MULTISYSTEMIC WASTING SYNDROME” IN BELGIUM
Author(s): 
P. Vyt, G. Labarque, M. Bos, H. Nauwynck, S. Roels, C. Miry, M. Pensaert, R. Ducatelle
Abstract: 
At the end of 1999 symptoms resembling the “postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome” (PMWS) were mentioned in the field. This article describes three cases in which the clinical symptoms could be confirmed by histopathology. In two cases electron microscopic examination revealed the presence of small aggregates of virus-like particles that were circular and had a diameter of 14 to 17 nm. In the third case, virologic examination demonstrated the presence of porcine circovirus (PCV) type 2. The clinical and (histo)pathological findings and the discussion about this syndrome and its etiology are briefly described to focus the attention of the practitioner.
Full text: 
pp 435-440
Case report(s)

69 (6) 431-434

Title: 
Antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus intermedius strains isolated from dogs in Belgium
Author(s): 
E. Donné, L. Devriese, F. Haesebrouck
Abstract: 
Only 19% of 84 Staphylococcus intermedius strains isolated between 1997 and 1999 from skin lesions in dogs showed normal sensitivity to antibiotics. Most resistances involved penicillinase-labile penicillins (64%), tetracyclines (53%) and sulphonamides (44%), combined in dual or multiple resistance patterns. Other frequently occurring resistances included macrolide- and lincosamide cross-resistance. The resistance percentages are compared in a table with those found in 1982 and 1986 in a similar study. The increase of macrolide lincosamide crossresistance from 11 to 33% was the most striking finding.
Full text: 
pp 431-434
Original article(s)

69 (6) 422-430

Title: 
Nieuwe ontwikkelingen in de cryopreservatie van embryo's bij grote huisdieren (Dutch)
Author(s): 
A. VAN SOOM, V. DE BACKER, A. DE KRUIF
pp 422-430
Review(s)

69 (6) 412-421

Title: 
Bèta-glucanen als immunostimulantia en als adjuvantia (Dutch)
Author(s): 
S. VANCAENEGHEM, E. COX, P. DEPREZ, S. ARNOUTS, B. M. GODDEERIS
pp 412-421
Review(s)

69 (6) 407-411

Title: 
IS CONSCIOUSNESS A USEFUL SCIENTIFIC TERM? PROBLEMS OF 'animal consciousness'
Author(s): 
R. W. Byrne
Abstract: 
Application of the normal procedures of scientific hypothesis testing to the question of animal consciousness is flawed, since it presupposes that consciousness (and more especially, its lack) can be reliably identified. Cognitive psychology has made little explanatory use of the concept of consciousness, and comparative psychology has no safe means of pursuing its evolution. It is proposed that the vexed issue of consciousness in animals is not linked to their welfare, which should instead be decided by objective ethological evidence, backed by firm presumptions of “conscious until proven otherwise”.
Full text: 
pp 407-411

69 (6) 401-406

Title: 
PAINISM – HISTORICAL AND ETHICAL ASPECTS
Author(s): 
R. D. Ryder
Abstract: 
Pain, broadly defined to cover all types of suffering, should form the basis for ethics. Utilitarianism, however, is rejected. Pains cannot be meaningfully aggregated across individuals. In painism, the pain of the maximum sufferer takes precedence in each case. Rules for applying pianism are proposed. The author’s term speciesism is used to attack the limiting of ethics to the human species alone; all painients should be included.
Full text: 
pp 401-411
Symposium over pijn

69 (6) 392-400

Title: 
NEURONAL BASIS OF CONSCIOUS EXPERIENCES IN THE ANIMAL KINGDOM
Author(s): 
W. van de Grind
Abstract: 
The study of conscious experiences in animals has been suppressed for a long time by the dominance of behaviorism and by the conviction that it would be impossible to study private experiences experimentally. Times have changed and viable techniques have been developed to use conscious experiences as experimental variables. I outline a conceptual model illustrating why conscious experiences have survival value and have been selected for. The model ties conscious experiences to learning and to potential messages for biocommunication. It is argued that ethics based on uneducated gut feelings is not a reliable guide to conduct and that we urgently need experimental studies of conscious experience, including studies on pain and suffering. Examples of promising approaches in the field of conscious visual experiences (percepts) are given to show that neuroscience has progressed far enough to start to solve puzzles regarding conscious experiences in the animal kingdom.
Full text: 
pp 392-400

69 (6) 385-391

Title: 
PAIN, WHAT IS IT AND WHY DO WE CARE?
Author(s): 
E. Vermeersch
Abstract: 
In the first part a series of methodological remarks are presented mainly concerning the use and relevance of concepts such as pain and suffering, the ‘observer-oriented’ vs. the ‘ego-oriented’ approach, the principle of parsimony vs. the principle of caution, and the ethical vs. the factual approach. The general conclusion is that the concepts of pain and suffering have their proper value, conditional upon their use being restricted to their specific domain. In the second part some suggestions are made about the way in which a foundation for an ethics of pain and suffering may be laid.
Full text: 
pp 385-391

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