72 (6) 417-423

Title: 
CLINICAL NAVICULAR DISEASE SYNDROME IN THE HORSE
Author(s): 
F. Verschooten, K. Zaman, K. Peremans
Abstract: 

Clinical navicular disease (CND) is a classification diagnosis defined as a lameness originating in the foot with clinical signs compatible with navicular disease syndrome (ND): the lameness is blocked by distal digital palmar analgesia (DDPA) and no radiographic signs of ND are present. Fifty horses with CND were injected with corticosteroid intra-articularly into the distal interphalangeal (D.I.P.) joint to evaluate the effect of such applications. Follow-up was done by questionnaire, and mean follow-up time was at least one year. Within three to four days after “treatment,” 34% of the horses were sound and remained so for two months and longer. In 66% of the horses, no or insufficient (less than two months) effect was recorded. It is suggested that, in horses with CND, 1/3 might have lameness originating from the palmar compartment of the D.I.P. joint, and 2/3 have pain that might be localized in the bursa (results of previous study).

Full text: 
pp 417-423
Original article(s)