2008 - 77 (1)

Volume 77 (2008), nr. 

77 (1) 47-50

Title: 
TTA of Tibial Tuberosity Advancement – een nieuwe techniek voor de chirurgische behandeling van voorste kruisbandruptuur bij de hond (Dutch)
Author(s): 
A. BERGENHUYZEN, Y. SAMOY, B. VAN RYSSEN, D. VAN VYNCKT, G. VERHOEVEN, P. VERLEYEN, K. VERMOTE
Abstract: 
Paper in Dutch
Full text: 
pp 47-50
Continuing professional development

77 (1) 40-46

Title: 
Work-related accidents and occupational diseases in veterinary practice in Flanders (Belgium)
Author(s): 
C. MEERS, J. DEWULF, A. DE KRUIF
Abstract: 
Veterinarians are relatively frequently unable to work due to work-related accidents or occupational diseases.This is the result of the large number of health risks related to the exercise of the veterinary profession. In addition,mental disorders such as depression and burn-out are becoming increasingly common. Up till now, therewas no information available regarding physical and mental disorders in the veterinary profession in Flanders.The aim of this study was to describe the occurrence of the most important work-related diseases and accidentsin veterinarians in Flanders. This was done by means of an inquiry filled in by 229 veterinarians. In the inquiry,questions were asked concerning allergies, physical and chemical risks, zoonoses, injuries of the musculo-skeletalsystem and the psychological pressure of the profession. Over 35% of the respondents suffer from nasalallergy, allergic symptoms of the eyes or asthma. Within this group, 38% of the cases are due to allergens fromanimals. One out of four respondents suffers from eczema on the hands, the wrists or the lower arms. No less then62% of the respondents suffer from pain in the back and these are working in all types of practices (rural practice,horses, and companion animals). Neck pain is most common in small animal practice, whereas pain in the elbowoccurs most frequently in bovine practitioners. Scratch injuries from cats (67%), bite injuries from dogs or cats(64%), kicks of horses or cattle (61%), bite injuries from horses (16.6%), self injections (61%) and cuts (56%) arethe most common injuries. Nearly 50% of the respondents have suffered from at least one zoonotic disease, andfor 39% of these respondents, the disease was due to fungal infection of the skin. One out of four veterinariansthat often work with gas anesthetics suffers from time to time from headache and nausea due to the gasses used.Finally, the inquiry revealed that the practitioners work on average 58 hours a week (min = 7, max =100), and89% suffer from stress from time to time.On the basis of the data collected, it can be concluded that the veterinary profession involves a substantialnumber of health risks. The results also indicate the necessity of more and better information and preventionconcerning health risks, since many of the injuries and diseases can easily be prevented.
Full text: 
pp 40-46
In practice

77 (1) 35-39

Title: 
Six cases of tube cystostomy in small animals: indications, treatment and outcome
Author(s): 
G. ROTH, H. DE ROOSTER
Abstract: 
Indirect cystostomy is performed to provide urinary diversion in animals with urinary obstruction. Tube cystostomyis a relatively easy technique for rerouting the urine outflow. Four cats and two dogs underwent tubecystostomy with a foleycatheter. The six cases are discussed in a retrospective study. All patients had mictionproblems due to lower urinary tract disease. The main complication was urinary tract infection. Home care aftertube cystostomy was minimal.
Full text: 
pp 35-39
Case report(s)

77 (1) 29-34

Title: 
Pustular dermatitis by Listeria monocytogenes after the assisted delivery of a dead calf
Author(s): 
J. LAUREYNS, H. MOYAERT, H. WERBROUCK, B. CATRY, A. DE KRUIF, F. PASMANS
Abstract: 
Two days after the manual delivery of a dead calf, a 55-year-old healthy veterinary practitioner developedwidespread pustular rash on both arms, followed by fever, myalgia and headache. Examination ofthe pustulae revealed Listeria monocytogenes. In addition to the case report, this article also briefly discussesthe zoonotic aspect of listeriosis.
Full text: 
pp 29-34
Case report(s)

77 (1) 26-28

Title: 
Perirectal pyogranulomatous inflammation causing rectal obstruction and colic in a Norwegian Fjord gelding
Author(s): 
L. M. HUNT, S. VAN POUCKE
Abstract: 
An 18-month-old Fjord gelding was examined for colic and clinical signs of tenesmus and dyschezia.Rectal examination and transrectal ultrasonography showed a firm tissue mass on the dorsolateral aspectof the left rectal wall. Histopathology of multiple perirectal tru-cut biopsies revealed a pyogranulomatousinflammation. Cultures for microorganisms were negative. A diagnosis of extra-luminal rectal pyogranulomatousinflammation was made. Conservative treatment resulted in complete remission.
Full text: 
pp 26-28
Case report(s)

77 (1) 23-25

Title: 
case of feline paraneoplastic alopecia associated with a pancreatic adenocarcinoma
Author(s): 
K. FLORIZOONE
Abstract: 
A 12-year-old intact male Domestic Shorthair cat is described with anorexia, diarrhea and lethargy.Alopecia was noted around the nasal planum, the eyes and the mouth, and on the medial forelimbs andventral abdomen. The footpads were soft and painful. There was no pruritus. The skin of the forelimbs hada shiny appearance. Euthanasia was requested by the owner and necropsy revealed an adenocarcinoma ofthe pancreas with metastatic lesions in the liver and the omentum. Post-mortem examination of the skinrevealed marked follicular atrophy and miniaturization. The cat in this report had a glistening alopecia,despite the presence of the stratum corneum and the absence of pruritus.
Full text: 
pp 23-25
Case report(s)

77 (1) 10-22

Title: 
Myeloproliferatieve ziekten bij kleine huisdieren (Dutch)
Author(s): 
B. OLMEN, D. PAPEPE, S. DAMINET
Abstract: 
Paper in Dutch
Full text: 
pp 10-22
Review(s)

77 (1) 2-9

Title: 
Equine sarcoids - part 1: clinical presentation and epidemiology
Author(s): 
L. BOGAERT, A. MARTENS, P. DEPOORTER, F. GASTHUYS
Abstract: 
Equine sarcoids are the most common skin tumors in horses and other equids. In their pathogenesis, thebovine papillomavirus (BPV) plays a major role. Many clinical manifestations have been described, rangingfrom small single lesions to multiple aggressively growing masses. Histopathologically, it is consideredas a biphasic tumor with epidermal hyperplasia and subepidermal proliferation of transformed fibroblasts.The diagnosis can be made clinically, histopathologically and/or by detection of BPV DNA. Sarcoidscan appear on any part of the body, but they are mostly localized on the ventral abdomen, the paragenitalregion, head and limbs. Sarcoids occur independent of breed, coat color, sex or age, but they develop morecommonly in young adults and certain families and breeds are more vulnerable than others. Transmissionof BPV is supposed to happen from cattle to horse or from horse to horse, possibly via insects.
Full text: 
pp 2-9
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