2010 - 79 (6)

Volume 79 (2010), nr. 6

79 (6) pp 471-473

Abstract: 
Paper in Dutch
Full text: 
pp 471-473
Question and answer

79 (6) pp 467-470

Title: 
Semen collection, assessment and artificial insemination in the cat
Author(s): 
T. RIJSSELAERE, A. VAN SOOM
Abstract: 
The first successful artificial insemination in cats was described 40 years ago. However, the inseminationin cats is at present not as commonly performed in daily veterinary practice as the insemination in dogs dueto the practical difficulties in collecting a sperm sample from the tomcat, the small volume of the spermobtained, the few possibilities to determine the optimal timing of insemination and the need for ovulationinduction and sedation of the queen. Recently, a new and practical method has been described for spermcollection, using urethral catheterization after sedation of the tomcat with medetomidine. Sperm cansubsequently be inseminated in the vagina or directly into the uterus by laparotomy or transcervicalcatheterization.
Full text: 
pp 467-470
Continuing professional development

79 (6) pp 463-466

Title: 
Technieken voor kunstmatige inseminatie bij de hond (Dutch)
Author(s): 
T. RIJSSELAERE, A. VAN SOOM
Abstract: 
During the last decades there has been an increasing interest in artificial insemination in the dog. The inseminationof a bitch can be performed using fresh, chilled or frozen-thawed semen. Sperm can be inseminated in the vaginaby using a plastic insemination device or by the Osiris catheter. Intra-uterine insemination can be performed bymeans of laparotomy which is ethically controversial and prohibited in several countries. Better techniques for intra-uterine insemination are the transcervical catheter or the insemination of a catheter under endoscopic visualization.Intra-uterine insemination results in higher whelping rates for fresh, chilled and frozen-thawed semen than intravaginaldeposition and additionally results in higher litter sizes when frozen-thawed semen is used.
Full text: 
pp 463-466
Continuing professional development

79 (6) pp 460-462

Title: 
Chytridiomycosis related mortality in a midwife toad (Alytes obstetricans) in Belgium
Author(s): 
F. PASMANS, M. MUIJSERS, S. MAES, P. VAN ROOIJ, M. BRUTYN, R. DUCATELLE, F. HAESEBROUCK, A. MARTEL
Abstract: 
Chytridiomycosis, caused by the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, contributes to amphibian declines worldwide. Recently, the fungus has shown to be widely distributed in Belgium and the Netherlands, although no clinical cases of the disease have been diagnosed yet. This case report describes the first case of mortality due to chytridiomycosis in Belgium in a wild population of midwife toads (Alytes obstetricans). The presence of clinical chytridiomycosis, combined with the relatively high prevalence of the fungus in Belgium, emphasizes the urgent need for a thorough study on the impact of infection on the native amphibian populations in Belgium.
pp 460-462
Case report(s)

79 (6) pp 452-459

Title: 
Necrotizing encephalitis in the Yorkshire terrier: a retrospective study (1990-2008)
Author(s): 
A.BOLCKMANS, I. GIELEN, I. VAN SOENS, S. BHATTI, L. PONCELET, K. CHIERS, L. VAN HAM
Abstract: 
In this retrospective study thirteen Yorkshire terriers with histopathologically confirmed necrotizing encephalitiswere studied. All the dogs had progressive neurologic symptoms compatible with a cerebral or a brainstem disease.The blood work revealed increased creatinine kinase (CK) levels in most cases. The cerebrospinal fluid analysis wascharacterized by elevated protein concentrations and mononuclear pleocytosis. Computed tomography (CT) scansrevealed hypodense areas, ventriculomegaly and contrast enhancement. All thirteen Yorkshire terriers were euthanizeddue to the progressive course of this brain disease and the lack of an effective treatment.
Full text: 
pp 452-459
Original article(s)

79 (6) pp 445-451

Title: 
Metabolic programming: background and potential impact for dairy cattle
Author(s): 
M. KASKE, S. WIEDEMANN, H. KUNZ
Abstract: 
Metabolic programming is defined as a nutritional intrauterine and/or early postnatal stimulus or insultat a critical period of development with lasting or lifelong significance. Thus growth, milk yield and fertilityas decisive parameters for the productivity of ruminants are influenced not only by genetic and environmentalfactors, but also by epigenetics. In the past decade, knowledge of the impact of metabolic programming inhumans and rodents in their later lives has increased considerably. Despite striking differences between themetabolic systems of ruminants and those of monogastric species, metabolic programming has a markedimpact on the ruminant species as well. Especially during the first weeks of life, an adequate supply of nutrientsis pivotal. Recent studies have demonstrated the advantages of intensified feeding of the preweaning calf forachieving better performance in the resulting dairy cow. Further research will be needed to elucidate thepotential of specific tools to manipulate metabolic programming for the purpose of improving the productivityand fertility of cattle.
Full text: 
pp 445-451
Review(s)

79 (6) pp 436-444

Title: 
Fasciola hepatica bij het paard (Dutch)
Author(s): 
H. NELIS, T. GEURDEN, P. DEPREZ
Abstract: 
Paper in Dutch
Full text: 
pp 436-444
Review(s)

79 (6) pp 429-435

Title: 
The avian air sacs: visualization in the chicken by means of the corrosion casting technique
Author(s): 
C. CASTELEYN, D. FRANÇOYS, P. SIMOENS, W. VAN DEN BROECK
Abstract: 
Because of their important physiological functions, the avian air sacs have already been described in detail.However, three-dimensional illustrations, which are very useful for clinical research and in particular for medicalimaging, are sparse. Therefore, in the present study the air sac system of young chickens was visualized using thecorrosion casting technique. The 9 air sacs that could be demonstrated were the unpaired clavicular air sac and thepaired cervical, cranial and caudal thoracic, and abdominal air sacs. The latter were by far the largest and wereinterwoven with the abdominal organs. The numerous diverticles extending from the air sacs were rather small. Thismight be the result of the applied technique or the fact that the air sac system has not yet been fully developed in youngbirds. Further studies investigating potential species differences or conformational changes of the air sacs in growinganimals are valuable.
Full text: 
pp 424-429
Theme

79 (6) pp 424-428

Title: 
Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) in cats - part 2: case report
Author(s): 
G. PAES, J. VELDEMAN, D. PAEPE, J. SAUNDERS, S. DAMINET
Abstract: 
A two-year-old male domestic shorthair cat was referred to the Department of Small Animal Medicine andClinical Biology at the Ghent University, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Merelbeke, Belgium because oflethargy and anorexia. The cat had severe non-regenerative anemia and marked lymphocytosis. Primary nonregenerativeimmune-mediated hemolytic anemia was diagnosed on the basis of severe hemolytic anemia incombination with a positive osmotic fragility test, a positive Coombs test and the exclusion of underlyingcauses. A bone marrow core biopsy revealed erythroid maturation arrest with mild myelodysplasia. The catresponded quickly to treatment with a blood transfusion and immunosuppressive dosages of prednisolone. Theprednisolone was tapered down and stopped after 5 months. Two years after the initial diagnosis, there wereno signs of clinical relapse.
Full text: 
pp 424-428
Theme

79 (6) pp 415-424

Title: 
Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) in cats - part 1: a review
Author(s): 
G. PAES, D. PAEPE, J. VELDEMAN, M. CAMPOS, S. DAMINET
Abstract: 
In contrast to dogs, immune-mediated hemolytic anemia is rarely seen in cats and occurs most oftensecondary to an underlying infectious, neoplastic or inflammatory process. Clinical symptoms are often vagueand are caused by severe anemia and the effect of hypoxia on organ systems. Laboratory abnormalities in catswith IMHA are comparable to those seen in dogs, with the exception of spherocytes, which are difficult toidentify in cats. The diagnosis is based on hemolytic anemia in combination with a positive ‘true’autoagglutination and/or a positive Coombs test. A search for underlying causes should always be performedand, because infections with hemotrophic mycoplasma species are the most important underlying cause forIMHA in cats, a polymerase chain reaction test to detect these bacteria should be carried out. Treatmentconsists of immunosuppressive drugs, providing oxygen-carrying solutions, treating underlying causes andsupportive care. In cats, IMHA carries a better prognosis than in dogs, although relapses are seen in equalfrequency.
Full text: 
pp 415-424
Theme