2012 - 81 (6)

Volume 81 (2012), nr. 6

81 (6) pp 382-384

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pp 382-384
Question and answer

81 (6) pp 373-381

Title: 
Het belang van een degelijk colostrummanagement op moderne rundveebedrijven
Author(s): 
V. MEGANCK, J. LAUREYNS, G. OPSOMER
Abstract: 
Article in Dutch, no abstract in English.
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pp 373-381
Continuing professional development

81 (6) pp 364-372

Title: 
Paraprostatic cyst with urothelial lining in a dog
Author(s): 
L. CICCHELERO, S. HUYGHE, K. CHIERS, V. VOLCKAERT, S. MELIS, D. PAEPE, A. FURCAS, H. DE ROOSTER
Abstract: 
An infected paraprostatic cyst originating from the prostate parenchyma was diagnosed in a seven-yearoldmale American Staffordshire terrier with dysuria. The diagnosis was based on the history, the clinicaland ultrasonographic findings, bacteriological culture, extensive histopathological examination and aDNA-test. Treatment consisted of the surgical removal of a great part of the cyst and the omentalizationof the remnant, castration and antibiotic therapy. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated an urothelial liningof the cyst. A DNA-test excluded persistent Müllerian duct syndrome (PMDS). The cyst had an openconnection with the urethra and probably originated from an embryonic remnant located in the prostaticgland. The dog had a prosperous recovery but the dysuria and urinary incontinence persisted. At fourmonths postoperatively, a new paraprostatic cyst was diagnosed by ultrasound. Aspiration of its contentrevealed infected urine.
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pp 364-372
Case report(s)

81 (6) pp 357-363

Title: 
Unilateral sino-orbital and subcutaneous aspergillosis in a cat
Author(s): 
J. DECLERCQ, L. DECLERCQ, S. FINCIOEN
Abstract: 
After a period of sneezing and conjunctivitis, a young female cat was presented with leftsided facialsubcutaneous swellings and ocular disease characterized by a hyperemic conjunctiva with protrusion ofthe third eyelid. In the oral cavity, swellings were present labial of the premolar teeth and in thepterygopalatine fossa. The left submandibular lymphnode was enlarged. The cat sneezed from time totime but there was no nasal discharge. The skin lesions had a distinctive yellow color. Cytology of affectedskin revealed pyogranulomatous inflammation with eosinophils. Only deep sampling of the skin containedrepresentative tissue for cytologic, histopathologic and mycologic examination. Aspergillus sectionfumigatus was diagnosed on morphologic aspects of the mycologic culture and the fungus was identifiedby molecular technology as Aspergillus viridinutans. The definite diagnosis was sino-orbital aspergillosiswith extensive subcutaneous invasion. Due to progressive disease despite therapy, the cat was euthanized.
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pp 357-363
Case report(s)

81 (6) pp 352-357

Title: 
Mediastinal thymoma in a rabbit with recurrent bilateral exophthalmos
Author(s): 
G. STORMS, G. JANSSENS, R. DUCATELLE
Abstract: 
An 8-year-old, male, castrated, medium-sized domestic rabbit presented with a bilateral, transient and stress-related exophthalmos. Thoracic radiographs revealed a large mass cranial to the heart. The rabbit was euthanized because of severe respiratory distress. At necropsy, a large well-circumscribed, kidneyshaped mass was present in the cranial mediastinum without macroscopic abnormalities in the other organs.The mass itself was composed of a mixed population of small and medium sized round cells in a fine reticular stroma. The medium sized cells and large cells stained intensely positive for cytokeratin in the cytoplasm, confirming the diagnosis of thymoma and excluding lymphoma.
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pp 352-357
Case report(s)

81 (6) pp 341-351

Title: 
Canine lymphoma: a retrospective study (2009 – 2010)
Author(s): 
F. MORTIER, S. DAMINET, S. VANDENABEELE, I. VAN DE MAELE
Abstract: 
This study reviews the medical records of 56 dogs diagnosed with lymphoma based on thecytological and/or histological results between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2010. Most of thedogs were middle-aged to old, and were diagnosed with multicentric lymphoma (ML) (n=36). Themajority of the dogs were presented in stages III to V (n=55) and substage b (n=43). A completeblood count and serum biochemistry, urinalysis, serum protein electrophoresis, thoracic radiographsand/or abdominal ultrasound were performed. The results correlated with previously describedresults in the literature. Therapy was initiated in 80% of the dogs (n=45). After diagnosis, the mediansurvival time of 62% of these dogs (n=28) treated with only prednisolone was 32 days (range 3 – 224days). For 24% of the dogs (n=11) treated with chemotherapy, the median survival time was 119days (range 11 - 273 days). Surgical resection of the macroscopic tumor was performed in theremaining six dogs (13%). Three of these dogs received subsequent prednisolone therapy. Themedian survival time of these six dogs was 47 days (range 0 – 669 days). The dogs that receivedchemotherapy had significantly longer survival times than those treated with only prednisolone,although negative prognostic factors were present in all of the cases treated with chemotherapy.
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pp 341-351
Original article(s)

81 (6) pp 329-340

Title: 
New artificial reproductive techniques in the horse: applications and limitations
Author(s): 
B. LEEMANS, K. SMITS, A. VAN SOOM, H. NELIS
Abstract: 
Recent developments in the assisted reproduction in horses allow to breed foals from sub- and infertilemares, as well as from recently deceased mares or stallions. Oocytes can be obtained from live donormares by ovum pick-up (OPU), by flushing oocytes from follicles using a transvaginal or transabdominalapproach. Post mortem oocytes can be obtained by scraping the follicles. After oocyte maturation, theoocytes can be fertilized in vitro or can be transferred to the oviduct of an inseminated recipient mare (invivo). Since conventional in vitro fertilization (IVF) is very unsuccessful in the horse, fertilization isperformed by intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). After ICSI, the fertilized oocytes can be transferredto the oviduct of a synchronized recipient mare or further cultured in vitro up to the blastocyst stage.Subsequently, obtained blastocyts can be transferred to the uterus of a recipient mare. In this article, in vitroembryo production in the horse is highlighted, and possible advantages and disadvantages and clinicaland scientific applications are reviewed.
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pp 329-340
Review(s)

81 (6) pp 319-328

Title: 
The use of cardiac biomarkers in veterinary medicine: the equine perspective
Author(s): 
N. VAN DER VEKENS, A. DECLOEDT, D. DE CLERCQ, T. VERHEYEN, G. VAN LOON
Abstract: 
In human medicine, cardiac biomarkers, such as natriuretic peptides and troponins, areroutinely used for the diagnosis, prognosis and monitoring of heart diseases. Similarly, thesebiomarkers are determined in small animals to differentiate non-cardiac from cardiac diseases.Knowledge about these biomarkers in horses is limited and requires further investigation.The first equine studies about atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and N-terminal ANP (NT-proANP)are promising, and show a clear correlation with atrial dimension size. Equine brain natriureticpeptides assays are still unavailable. The troponins, in particular troponin I, have been moreextensively studied in horses, and their use for the diagnosis of myocardial damage has been fullydemonstrated. They have replaced the less specific lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase isoenzymes,which makes the use of the last mentioned no longer legitimate. A final possible equinebiomarker is aldosterone. Reference values in horses have been established. However, in only onestudy, a correlation between aldosterone and cardiac disease has been reported.
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pp 319-328
Review(s)