2012 - 81 (4)

Volume 81 (2012), nr. 4

81 (4) pp 247-249

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pp 247-249
Question and answer

81 (4) pp 237-246

Title: 
From mules, horses and livestock to companion animals: a linguistic-etymological approach to veterinary history, mirroring animal and (mainly) human welfare
Author(s): 
L. DEVRIESE
Abstract: 
In some languages, major changes in the veterinary profession are mirrored in the names usedby those engaged in this branch of medicine during different periods of history. These names weremost often derived from the animal species that were of predominant importance in any given period.The terms veterinarius, mulomedicus (mule healer) and hippiater (horse doctor) reflect themajor importance of these animals in Roman and Greek antiquity. Draft and pack animals (Latin:veterina) played a major role in the improvement of mankind’s living conditions. Without their help,men and women had to do all the heavy labor with the help only of primitive instruments, and theyhad to transport all burdens themselves.Horses became of paramount importance in warfare. Chivalry (cheval in French: horse) attaineda high status in mediaeval society. This high esteem for horses, horse riding and everything associatedwith it continued even after the horse had lost its military significance. We see this in terms suchas maréchal in French (meaning both ‘shoeing smith’ and ‘field-marshal’), marshal in English,maarschalk in Dutch, derived from an old Germanic word for ‘keeper of the horses’ but originallymeaning ‘horse boy’. Similar titles were paardenmeester for ‘horse master’ in Dutch, and Rossarztor Pferdarzt in German.The terms veterinarian and vétérinaire, which are generally used in English and French, do notdifferentiate between the species and types of animals involved. This term, derived from the learnedLatin medicus veterinarius, was not created by the public, but rather was promoted by the early veterinaryschools and professional organizations. Its supposedly general meaning was most probablya factor that guided the choice of its use. Nobody alluded to its primary significance (etymology) involvingthe care of ‘beasts of burden’, and it is a pity that almost no one any longer is aware of this.The enormous role that these humble animals once played in the liberation of mankind from slavishlabor, and from slavery itself, remains practically unknown. The term ‘veterinary’ has lost nothingof its forgotten original content. Knowledge about this may help to rehabilitate the humbledonkeys, the mules and other beasts of burden who delivered mankind from much arduous labor... and became our slaves.
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pp 237-246
Veterinary past

81 (4) pp 229-236

Title: 
Dissociatieve anesthesie bij paarden in de praktijk
Author(s): 
S. SCHAUVLIEGE, F. GASTHUYS
Abstract: 
Article in Dutch, no abstract in English.
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pp 229-236
Continuing professional development

81 (4) pp 224-228

Title: 
Coinfection with Mycoplasma haemofelis and ‘Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum’ in a cat with immune-mediated hemolytic anemia in Belgium
Author(s): 
C. VAN GEFFEN
Abstract: 
A young male domestic Shorthair was presented with weakness and anorexia of two days’ duration.Physical examination showed pale mucous membranes, caused by severe, regenerative,Coombs’ positive, hemolytic anemia. A blood smear revealed epicellular organisms compatible withMycoplasma spp. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) on EDTA blood identified these organismsas Mycoplasma haemofelis and ‘Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum’. Despite thelack of clearance of the organism from the blood, the cat responded well to antibiotic treatment withdoxycycline, together with immunosuppressive doses of corticosteroids.
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pp 224-228
Case report(s)

81 (4) pp 216-223

Title: 
Eosinophilic bronchopneumonia in a Cavalier King Charles spaniel
Author(s): 
S. OPDENAKKER, E. VAN DER VEKENS, M. JENNES, V. BAVEGEMS
Abstract: 
The present case describes a dog with eosinophilic bronchopneumonia. The dog was presented with ahistory of coughing and dyspnea at the Department of Small Animal Medicine, Faculty of VeterinaryMedicine, Ghent University. A presumptive diagnosis of Pneumocystic carinii was made based onsignalment, history, clinical examination, blood work and medical imaging, and the dog was treated withtrimethoprim-sulfadiazine. Because of lack of improvement, a bronchoalveolar lavage was performed andthe serum IgG and IgM concentrations were determined. Cytology of bronchoalveolar lavage showed anexcessive amount of eosinophils. The IgG was within normal limits and the IgM was increased. Thesefindings excluded pneumocystosis as a possible cause, and the definitive diagnosis of eosinophilicbronchopneumonia was made. Prednisolone was added to the treatment. The dog was sent home with atreatment of trimethoprim-sulfadiazine and prednisolone gradually diminished. On control, six weekslater, the dog only coughed occasionally, and another three months later it was free of coughing.
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pp 216-223
Case report(s)

81 (4) pp 211-215

Title: 
Osteochondritis dissecans of the knee in a German shepherd dog
Author(s): 
M. FRANÇOIS, D. VAN VYNCKT, J. SAUNDERS, B. VAN RYSSEN
Abstract: 
Lameness due to orthopedic problems in hind limbs often occurs in dogs. Hip dysplasia is the maincause of lameness in young adult dogs of large breeds. If the problem is localized in the stifle joint,osteochondritis dissecans should always be considered, besides patellar luxation and early ruptures of thecranial cruciate ligament. Diagnostic findings and therapy are illustrated by a clinical case ofosteochondritis dissecans in a young German shepherd dog.
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pp 211-215
Case report(s)

81 (4) pp 205-210

Title: 
The use of tylvalosin (Aivlosin®) in the successful elimination of swine dysentery on a farrow-to-finish herd
Author(s): 
P. VYT, L. VANDEPITTE, A. DEREU, M. ROOZEN
Abstract: 
Swine dysentery causes severe economic losses in swine industry. Eliminating the disease at farmlevel can become problematic when resistance of the causative agent, Brachyspira hyodysenteriae,against pleuromutilins is reported. In this study, the use of tylvalosin (Aivlosin®) in eliminating the diseasein a single-site, farrow-to-finish herd was evaluated. In addition, productivity parameters andantimicrobial use were compared prior to and after implementing the elimination protocol.On a mixed farm of 200 sows and 1500 finishers with a history of chronic dysentery, the B. hyodysenteriaeisolate was resistant to pleuromutilins but had a low minimum inhibitory concentration fortylvalosin (2 μg/ml). Combined with a strict program for rodent control and hygiene, sows were treatedwith tylvalosin at a dose of 4.25 mg/kg BW daily for four weeks. The sows were washed one weekafter the start of the treatment before entering a clean stable. Piglets born from sows that had receivedthis treatment, were considered free from dysentery and were kept separated from infected, untreatedanimals on the farm. A monitoring program with monthly sampling of sows and fatteners wasinstalled to evaluate the absence of B. hyodysenteriae on the farm.After treatment, the clinical symptoms in the treated sows disappeared and remained absent in theoffspring born after the procedure. Fecal samples examined by PCR remained negative for the wholetesting period (14 months after the end of the treatment) and no clinical outbreaks were reported afterwards.The feed conversion ratio improved by 12%, the mortality rate with 37% and the antimicrobialuse decreased by 71.5%.We conclude that the elimination of swine dysentery on a single-site, farrow-to-finish herd is possibleusing tylvalosin (AivlosinR) combined with strict hygiene and rodent control. The improvementsof the technical parameters in this study are not only the result of the elimination of B. hyodysenteriae,but also changes in management practices influenced these parameters.
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pp 205-210
Original article(s)

81 (4) pp 195-204

Title: 
Monitoring of diabetic dogs
Author(s): 
A.WILLEMS, P. SMETS, I. VAN DE MAELE, S. VANDENABEELE, S. DAMINET
Abstract: 
Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common endocrine disorders in the dog. Although diagnosticsare relatively straightforward, treatment and especially adequate long-term monitoring arechallenging. To avoid complications, such as hypoglycemia, weight loss, diabetes ketoacidosis andurinary tract infections, adequate monitoring is indispensable. In this review different monitoringtools, such as history and clinical signs, single and serial blood glucose measurements, glycated bloodproducts, continuous glucose measurements and urine glucose will be evaluated. Because eachmonitoring technique has its limitations, the challenge for the veterinarian is to use an adequatecombination of these tools to obtain a good image of the patient’s glycemic status.
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pp 195-204
Review(s)