2012 - 81 (3)

Volume 81 (2012), nr. 3

81 (3) pp 138-148

Title: 
Subaortic stenosis in the Newfoundland: heredity, pathophysiology, diagnosis, prognosis and breeding advice
Author(s): 
K. CAESTECKER, L. PEELMAN, V. BAVEGEMS
Abstract: 
Subaortic stenosis is a narrowing of the left ventricular outflow tract just below the aortic valve, and is one ofthe most diagnosed congenital inherited heart diseases in the Newfoundland. The classification of subaortic stenosisis based on the lesions or the findings on echocardiography. Although the mode of inheritance is uncertain, a dominanttrait with variable penetrance is generally accepted. The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor oncogene is, togetherwith the Ptpn11-gene, a possible candidate gene to be involved in this disease. The diagnosis is particulary based onauscultation and echocardiography. The prognosis is variable and breeding advice is based on echocardiographicscreening at the age of eighteen months; however, it remains a difficult issue.
Full text: 
pp 138-148
Review(s)

81 (3) pp 158-167

Title: 
Induction of parturition in the sow
Author(s): 
R. DECALUWE, G.P.J. JANSSENS, I. DECLERCK, A. DE KRUIF, D. MAES
Abstract: 
Inducing parturition in the sow can be used to improve farrowing supervision, which may lead to moreweaned piglets. However, if not applied properly, it may lead to premature delivery. Therefore, induction ofparturition should be performed not earlier than two days before the average gestation length of the sows ofa farm.To induce parturition, different protocols, such as single administration of prostaglandins, doubleadministration of prostaglandin with 6-hour interval (split-dose technique) and a combination ofprostaglandins and oxytocin 24 hours later, and different administration routes, such as intramuscularinjection in the neck region and injection in the vulvar region, can be used. Other strategies exist but they areless effective and/or less frequently used.A single injection of prostaglandins results in 60% of the sows farrowing within working hours (22-32hours after injection). Using the split-dose technique or the combination of prostaglandins and oxytocin 24hours later, the percentage increases with 20%. The use of oxytocin however increases the risk of asphyxia inthe piglets, especially in case of inappropriate use. Whether farrowing induction should be applied and whichprotocol used depend on the herd and the preferences of the farmer.
Full text: 
pp 158-167
Review(s)

81 (3) pp 184-186

Full text: 
pp 184-186
Question and answer

81 (3) pp 174-182

Title: 
Profylactische gastropexie bij de hond: een overzicht van de chirurgische technieken
Author(s): 
S. DAVID, B. VAN GOETHEM, A. RUBIO-GUZMAN, H. DE ROOSTER
Abstract: 
Article in Dutch, no abstract in English
Full text: 
pp 174-182
Continuing professional development

81 (3) pp 168-173

Title: 
A case of epigastric heteropagus twinning with other congenital abnormalities in a Chihuahua puppy
Author(s): 
J. HOUSE, K.R. BARRAND, P. CORNILLIE
Abstract: 
A two-year-old Chihuahua was presented on day 58 of pregnancy due to very marked abdominaldistension. A cesarean section was performed and five normal and one clearly abnormal puppy were delivered.Examination of the abnormal puppy revealed a combination of congenital anomalies including epigastricheteropagus twinning. The autosite showed focal cranial aplasia cutis, anasarca, lissencephaly, palatoschisis,sternal agenesis and eventeratio (gastroschisis/schistocoelia). The partly formed parasitic twin was attachedat the sternal region of the autosite and demonstrated four formed limbs, atresia rectum, atresia ani, a singlekidney, tail agenesis and atresia vulvae. To the authors’ knowledge, this is only the third reported case ofheteropagus conjoined twinning in the dog and the first reported case of canine epigastric heteropagustwinning. In addition, there appear to be no reports in the veterinary literature noting an association withconjoined twinning in the dog with focal cranial aplasia cutis, eventeratio, lissencephaly, palatoschisis andanasarca. An in-depth literature review was hampered by the lack of a uniform nomenclature to identify thistype of conjoined twinning.
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pp 168-173
Case report(s)

81 (3) pp 149-157

Title: 
Some critical aspects of housing dairy cattle
Author(s): 
I. DECLERCK, S. VAN GANSBEKE, G. OPSOMER, S. DE VLIEGHER, A. DE KRUIF, D. MAES
Abstract: 
Housing is a key factor in animal welfare as it determines whether or not cows spend time in a comfortableliving place. Appropriate housing results in healthy cows living in a comfortable barn, optimizing production andreproduction.This article reviews some critical points of housing dairy cattle. In particular, free-stall barns with cubicles arediscussed, as these are the most common barn type in Belgium. First, the dimensions and all parts of the free-stall areconsidered as not applying the recommended dimensions leads to adverse consequences for welfare, hygiene and udderand claw health. Next, different types of bedding material and floor type, including their advantages/disadvantages, arehighlighted. Finally, the effects of photoperiodicity and stocking density are discussed.
Full text: 
pp 149-157
Review(s)

81 (3) pp 128-137

Title: 
Anesthesia in kittens: a review of the literature with stress on the possibilities in Belgium
Author(s): 
E.H.K.A. PEETERS, N. PORTERS, P.E.J. BOLS, M. NELISSEN, C.P.H. MOONS, H. DE ROOSTER, I. POLIS
Abstract: 
In Belgium, elective surgical procedures in very young small animals are rarely performed. Consequently, mostveterinarians have little experience in anesthetizing pediatric patients. This article describes potential problems ofanesthesia in kittens, which are mainly linked to their specific anatomy and physiology. Additionally, some practicalanesthetic protocols are highlighted. Combinations with ketamine are practical, economical and efficient options.
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pp 128-137
Review(s)

81 (3) pp 119-128

Title: 
Schmallenberg virus: emergence of an Orthobunyavirus among ruminants in Western Europe
Author(s): 
L. STEUKERS, G. BERTELS, A.B. CAY, H.J. NAUWYNCK
Abstract: 
Recently, a novel virus has been identified among ruminants in Western Europe. This virus, the so-calledSchmallenberg virus, belongs to the family Bunyaviridae, genus Orthobunyavirus, serogroup Simbu and isclosely related to Akabane, Aino and Shamonda virus. In cattle, acute symptoms in the dam and adult animalsgenerally include high fever, milk drop and diarrhea. More importantly, infection during gestation may leadto abortion, stillbirth and congenital malformations. As all bunyaviruses, Schmallenberg virus also uses vectorsfor efficient transmission. Closely related viruses causing similar symptoms, such as Akabane and Akabane-like viruses, are mainly transmitted by Culicoides. It is very likely that Schmallenberg virus is transmittedby similar vectors. This review provides an overview of Bunyaviridae, their epidemiology, symptoms, preventionand control. Special emphasis is put on the Simbu serogroup of the Orthobunyavirus genus pointing outthe similarities between them and closely related members.
Full text: 
pp 119-128
Review(s)