2015 - 84 (4)

Volume 84 (2015), nr. 4

84 (4) pg 232-234

Full text: 
pp 232-234
Question and answer

84 (4) pg 223-231

Title: 
Equine dentistry in the 21st century - Part 1. Dental pathology in the horse
Author(s): 
E. POLLARIS, L. VLAMINCK
Abstract: 
ABSTRACTHorse owners and veterinary surgeons have become aware of the necessity of performing regulardental check-ups in the horse. This has led to the understanding that the prevalence of dental pathologycan be very high. In the last decade, equine dentistry has undergone an enormous progress due toadvances in scientific knowledge, diagnosis and options of treatment. This first article in a series ofpapers on modern equine dentistry starts from the normal anatomy of the equine dentition to describethe diverse clinical aspects of dental abnormalities.
Full text: 
pp 223-231
Continuing professional development

84(4) pg 212-222

Title: 
The relationship between man and cat in the medieval and early modern Low Countries - I. The functional, demonological and imaginery cat
Author(s): 
E. AERTS
Abstract: 
ABSTRACTThe relationship between man and cat in the Low Countries between 600 and 1800 can bedescribed in such terms as kaleidoscopic, but also contradictory, problematic and ambiguous. Inthe early Middle Ages, people - particularly intellectuals within the Church - came to appreciatethe useful aspects of cats in their contacts with them, but from the 12th century, they begandemonizing the animal. At the same time, in both the literature and visual arts, a symbolicrepresentation was being developed that associated the cat with other negative qualities, such aslaziness, vanity, pride, and especially lust.
Full text: 
pp 212-222
Veterinary past

84 (4) pg 205-211

Title: 
First confirmed case of bovine besnoitiosis in an imported bull in Belgium
Author(s): 
A. VANHOUDT, B. PARDON, P. DE SCHUTTER, L. BOSSELER, C. SARRE, J. VERCRUYSSE, P. DEPREZ
Abstract: 
ABSTRACTBesnoitia besnoiti is a protozoan parasite known to cause important economic losses in thecattle industry in Africa, Asia and the Mediterranean area. In the last years, (re-) emergenceof the parasite has been reported in France, Germany, Hungary and Italy with in some cases,establishment of an endemic infection. In this article, the first case of besnoitiosis in Belgium ina Blonde d’Aquitaine bull imported from the south of France is described. Additionally, a briefoverview of the epidemiology of the disease is provided.
pp 205-211
Case report(s)

84 (4) pg 197-204

Title: 
Magnetic resonance findings and outcome in ten cats with traumatic spondylomyelopathy
Author(s): 
R. TAPIA-NIETO, G. B. CHERUBINI, S. JAKOVLJEVIC, A. CAINE
Abstract: 
ABSTRACTIn this retrospective study, the MR findings of ten cats with acute post-traumatic spondylomyelopathywere described and the most useful MR sequences were determined. Spinal cordinjury (SCI), bone and muscle trauma were compared with the clinical outcome (recovery oreuthanasia). The extension of spinal cord injury (SCI) was measured in vertebral body length(VBL). Of the ten cats, only five fully recovered. In the recovery group, no SCI (n=1) or SCI<1 VBL (n=4) were found. In the group of euthanized dogs, SCI > 2 VBLs (n=4) or spinal cordtransection (n=1) were found. Lesions were best seen on T2WSE (spinal cord injury), STIR (softtissue trauma) and T1WSE (bone injury). Low-field MR was therefore helpful to assess felinespinal trauma and may prove helpful to predict the clinical outcome, although a larger caseseries is needed. The authors suggest that protocols with low-field MR should include T1WSE,T2WSE and STIR sequences.
pp 197-204
Retrospective study and case report

84 (4) 188-196

Title: 
Clinical parameters as predictors of bacterial isolation in the uterine
Author(s): 
A.M. KITSHOFF, B. VAN GOETHEM, F. BOYEN, O. TAS, I. POLIS, H. DE ROOSTER
Abstract: 
ABSTRACTIn this study, female canines referred with clinical signs consistent with pyometra were prospectivelyevaluated. Signalment, clinical signs, laboratory findings and surgical findings werecompared between dogs with and without bacterial isolation based on aerobic techniques. Patientswith positive bacterial isolation were placed in the pyometra group, whereas patients withnegative bacterial isolation were grouped as mucometra. A total of 140 dogs (118 with pyometraand 22 with mucometra) met the inclusion criteria.Prereferral antibiotic administration was associated with a prolonged duration of clinicalsigns in the patients of the pyometra group (12 ± 2 days versus 7 ± 1 days; P=0.006). In the pyometrapatients, clinical signs, like pyrexia, anorexia and discomfort on abdominal palpation,were observed more commonly than in the mucometra group. The total leukocyte count wasthe only parameter that differed significantly between the two groups (P=0.01). Although no differencein color and consistency of the uterine fluid was noted, the uteri of the pyometra groupwere heavier (851.80 ± 800.30 g compared to 263.50 ± 297.10 g). E. coli was the most commonlyisolated bacterium (92/123).
pp 188-196
Prospective study

84 (4) pg 175-187

Title: 
Features of reproduction and assisted reproduction in the white (Ceratotherium simum) and black (Diceros bicornis) rhinoceros
Author(s): 
C. VERVERS, M. VAN ZIJLL LANGHOUT, J. GOVAERE, A. VAN SOOM
Abstract: 
ABSTRACTDespite the worldwide increase of rhinoceros calf numbers, the growth of the population ofwhite and black rhinoceros is slowing down mainly due to anthropogenic causes, such as poachingand habitat loss. Assisted reproduction is one of the methods of preserving the valuable genomesof these animals from being lost, and assists in breeding them in captivity to maintain the specie(s)numbers and provide an option for possible reintroduction into the wild. Since wild rhinocerosare difficult to handle and examine clinically, most of the current information available on theirreproductive characteristics has been gained from captive rhinoceros populations. Nevertheless,very little is known about rhinoceros reproduction. Since the rhinoceros belongs to the odd-toedungulates (Perissodactyls) group, like the horse and the tapir, the horse has been proposed as asuitable model to study reproduction and artificial reproductive techniques in the rhinoceros. Inthis review, the current knowledge of the reproduction of the rhinoceros is summarized.
pp 175-187
Review(s)