Theme

English

78 (1) 20-27

Title: 
Non-infectious causes of piglet mortality before weaning Part 1: factors related to the piglet
Author(s): 
R. LONCKE, J. DEWULF, C. VANDERHAEGHE, A. DE KRUIF, D. MAES
Abstract: 
Mortality in piglets before weaning is associated with major economic losses for the pig production. Mostsuckling piglets die during the first four days after birth, and mostly this is due to non-infectious factors. Causes orrisk factors can be related to the sow, the piglets and/or the environment. The present article reviews the mostimportant non-infectious factors related to the piglets namely low birth weight, splayleg, shaking piglets, navelbleeding, crushing and congenital malformations. Crushing by the sow is the most important cause. Piglet mortalitycan be reduced by treating or intensifying care taking of piglets with an increased risk, but the best results are obtainedby adopting preventive measures.
Full text: 
pp 20-27
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78 (1) 11-19

Title: 
De epidemiologie en aanpak van mastitis bij melkveevaarzen (Dutch)
Author(s): 
S. PIEPERS, G. OPSOMER, K. SUPRÉ, A. DE KRUIF, S. DE VLIEGHER
Abstract: 
Paper in Dutch
Full text: 
pp 11-19
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78 (1) 3-11

Title: 
Het belang van mastitis bij melkveevaarzen (Dutch)
Author(s): 
S. PIEPERS, G. OPSOMER, K. SUPRÉ, A. DE KRUIF, S. DE VLIEGHER
Abstract: 
Paper in Dutch
Full text: 
pp 3-11
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78 (2) 71-82

Title: 
Non-infectious causes of piglet mortality before weaning Part 2: factors related to the sow and the environment
Author(s): 
R. LONCKE, J. DEWULF, C. VANDERHAEGHE, A. DE KRUIF, D. MAES
Abstract: 
Piglet mortality before weaning is an important cause of economic loss in the pig production. Most pigletmortality occurs during the first four days after birth, and the major part is caused by non-infectious conditions. Thecauses can be found in the sow, the piglets as well as in the environment. This article gives a review of the mostimportant causes related to the sow or the environment. Regarding sow factors, emphasis is placed on lactationproblems, aggression, parity of the sow and litter size. Concerning the environment, the effect of temperature, traumaand poor herd health management are discussed.
Full text: 
pp 71-82
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78 (3) 155-159

Title: 
Hemotropic mycoplasmas in cats Part 2: case report
Author(s): 
M.B. DUIN, H. MOYAERT, I. VAN DE MAELE, S. DAMINET, F. BOYEN
Abstract: 
An eight-month-old apathic cat was referred to the Department of Medicine and Clinical Biology of SmallAnimals of the Ghent University Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Merelbeke, Belgium. The cat had a severecase of non-regenerative anemia with a hematocrit of only 2.9%. Cytological examination of a bone marrowaspirate led to the diagnosis of pure red cell aplasia (PRCA). Additionally, a PCR assay for “Candidatus Mycoplasmahaemominutum” (“Candidatus M. haemominutum”) DNA was positive. Although unproven, an infectionwith “Candidatus M. haemominutum” could have contributed to the immune-mediated destruction ofred blood cell precursors. The cat recovered completely after treatment, which consisted of multiple bloodtransfusions, antimicrobial agents, and long-term prednisolone therapy (10 months). There were no signs ofclinical relapse at 20 months after cessation of therapy.
Full text: 
pp 155-159
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78 (3) 143-155

Title: 
Hemotrofe mycoplasmen bij katten Deel 1: literatuuroverzicht (Dutch)
Author(s): 
M.B. DUIN, H. MOYAERT, F. PASMANS, F. BOYEN
Abstract: 
Paper in Dutch
Full text: 
pp 143-155
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79 (1) 13-22

Title: 
Acute pancreatitis in dogs and cats: pathogenesis, clinical signs and clinicopathologic findings
Author(s): 
I. VAN DEN BOSSCHE, D. PAEPE, S. DAMINET
Abstract: 
Acute pancreatitis is a (usually sterile) inflammation with acute onset and characterized by necrosis andedema; it does not permanently disrupt the pancreatic architecture and is completely reversible. It is thoughtthat, despite the pancreatic defense mechanisms, premature activation of trypsin in the acinar cells starts acascade of reactions that result in autodigestion. Most cases are idiopathic. Dogs are often presented withgastrointestinal signs, whereas lethargy and anorexia are the most commonly observed symptoms in cats.Diagnosing pancreatitis remains a challenge, but the recent development of the pancreatic lipaseimmunoreactivity test is promising.
Full text: 
pp 13-22
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79 (1) 3-12

Title: 
Insulinoma bij de hond deel 1: literatuuroverzicht (Dutch)
Author(s): 
E. PIETERS, A. VANHAESEBROUCK, L. VAN HAM
Abstract: 
Paper in Dutch
Full text: 
pp 3-12
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79 (2) 99-108

Title: 
Acute pancreatitis in dogs and cats: medical imaging, biopsy, treatment and prognosis
Author(s): 
I. VAN DEN BOSSCHE, D. PAEPE, J. SAUNDERS, M. HESTA, S. DAMINET
Abstract: 
Diagnosing acute pancreatitis in dogs and cats is difficult. Abdominal ultrasonography provides specificinformation about the size, shape and homogeneity of the pancreas, but is very dependent on the experienceof the operator and the quality of the echography machine. Abdominal radiography is less useful, whilecomputed tomography is less practicable in veterinary patients because of the anesthesia risks, the need forexperienced operators, and the high cost. Furthermore, computed tomography has low diagnostic value in cats.Biopsy of pancreatic tissue remains the gold standard. Treatment consists of fluid therapy and nutritionalsupport, combined with pain medication, anti-emetics and antibiotics. The prognosis in dogs and cats isvariable and largely depends on the clinical condition of the patient at admission. It is usually guarded,especially in cats.
Full text: 
pp 99-108
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79 (2) 91-98

Title: 
Insulinoma in the dog part 2: a retrospective study of 23 cases (2002-2008)
Author(s): 
E. PIETERS, A. VANHAESEBROUCK, S. DAMINET, J.H. SAUNDERS, K. PEREMANS, L. VAN HAM
Abstract: 
Twenty-three dogs with insulinoma were included in this retrospective study. These tumors were mostly foundin middle-aged to old dogs, weighing over 25 kg. The most important symptoms were weakness, seizures andcollapse. The mean duration of clinical signs before referral was 5 months. Interestingly, the onset of clinical signswas reported more frequently during the summer months.Paired serum glucose and insulin concentrations were measured in all dogs. Fructosamine concentrations weremeasured in more than one third of the cases, all showing levels lower than normal (258 μmol/l). In 50% of the dogs,abdominal ultrasound detected signs of an insulinoma, but only in one third of the cases nodules were visible.Scintigraphy, with the radiopharmaceutical drug Indium-111 pentetreotide, was performed in 6 dogs, with a detectionrate of 83%. Electrophysiological examination of 3 dogs confirmed the clinical signs of an insulinoma-associatedpolyneuropathy. Histopathological examination of 5 dogs demonstrated the presence of an insulinoma.In one third of the dogs metastases were present at the time of diagnosis. The mean survival time after diagnosiswas 10,3 months. There was no significant difference in survival between the medicinally and surgically treatedgroup. However, it is difficult to make a definitive conclusion, because of the low number of surgically treated dogs.
Full text: 
pp 91-98
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