Theme

English

72 (1) 20-26

Title: 
PRNP-genotype frequency sampling of the most important sheep breeds in Belgium
Author(s): 
LJ. PEELMAN, M. VAN POUCKE
Abstract: 
Scrapie in sheep is the prototype of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), of which BSE in cattle is the best known. Contrary to BSE in cattle, for which no genetic association with resistance has been found, sheep with a hereditary resistance to scrapie and BSE after experimental infection are known. Consequently, the selection of scrapie-resistant (ARR/ARR) sheep is currently one of the most important, if not the most important objective of the sheep breeding associations. The feasibility of obtaining a scrapie-resistant breed and the period in which it can be realised, mainly depend on the initial frequency of the ARR-allele of that specific breed. In this study, the PRNP-genotype and allele frequencies were sampled for the most important sheep breeds in Belgium. The genotyping of 854 animals revealed that 17.80 % of the tested animals are of the ARR/ARR-genotype and only 5 animals (0.59%) were of the most scrapie-sensitive genotype VRQ/VRQ. The frequency of the ARR-allele is 41.51%.
Full text: 
pp 20-26
Theme

72 (1) 12-19

Title: 
Anatomische, histologische en immunologische aspecten van de tonsillen bij het schaap in he kader van de BSR-problematiek (D)
Author(s): 
G. COCQUYT, A. GABRIEL, W. VAN DEN BROECK
pp 12-19
Theme

72 (2) 108-111

Title: 
Subclinical Pseudomonas aeruginosamastitis in a dairy herd
Author(s): 
D. BEEKCMAN, S. DE VLIEGHER, G. HOFLACK, G. OPSOMER, A. DE KRUIF
Abstract: 
This paper describes an outbreak of subclinical mastitis caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a dairy herd. An increase in the bulk milk somatic cell count from 82 000 to 327 000 cells/ml was observed over a period of one month. P. aeruginosa was diagnosed as the causal agent of the problems. All infected cows were identified using bacteriological culture of milk samples. As the farmer explicitly asked for a treatment, disinfection and renewal of the teat liners were carried out and all infected quarters and cows were treated systemically and intramammarily with a cephalosporin antibiotic. Treatment was unsuccessful and all persistently infected cows were culled, after which the bulk somatic cell count returned to a normal level.
Full text: 
pp 108-111
Theme

72 (2) 102-107

Title: 
Streptococcus agalactiae mastitis bij melkvee (Dutch)
Author(s): 
S. DE VLIEGHER, X. GOOSSENS, E. MIJTEN, G. OPSOMER, L. DE MEULEMEESTER, A. DE KRUIF
pp 102-107
Theme

72 (2) 96-101

Title: 
Pseudomonas aeruginosa mastitis bij melkvee (Dutch)
Author(s): 
S. DE VLIEGHER, K. DESIMPELAERE, G. OPSOMER, D. BEECKMAN, A. DE KRUIF
pp 96-101
Theme

72 (3) 168-179

Title: 
COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY (CT) IN SMALL ANIMALS. PART 2. CLINICAL APPLICATIONS
Author(s): 
I. Gielen, H. van Bree
Abstract: 
CT is an imaging tool with many applications in various clinical disciplines that is becoming increasingly available to the veterinary profession. CT is particularly valuable for the detection and diagnosis of brain diseases associated with mass lesions. The fact that some intracranial lesions may not be visible on CT is probably due to diffuse distribution, attenuation levels similar to those of the surrounding normal tissue, and minimal or absent contrast enhancement. CT is more accurate than conventional radiography in evaluating the localization, extent and characterization of lesions of the nasal cavity, sinuses, orbital, jaws, temporomandibular joints and tympanic bullae. CT appears to be remarkably accurate in revealing the location and extent of nasal diseases and is superior to conventional radiography for detecting middle ear disease. CT is useful in the investigation of spinal lesions in the event of doubtful radiographic and/or myelographic findings, and can be of help in surgical planning. CT is one of the best imaging modalities for the detection and description of masses, malformations and fluid collections in the thoracic cavity and is considered the most sensitive method for the detection of pulmonary metastases. CT of the abdomen gives excellent anatomic images of the organs and vessels, although the availability of ultrasound may have decreased the demand for abdominal studies. Skeletal CT may be helpful in clinical cases in which standard radiography is negative or inconclusive even though there is a high suspicion of pathology. CT has been proven to be superior in the diagnosis of fragmented coronoid process and other affections of the elbow joint.
Full text: 
pp 168-179
Theme

72 (3) 158-167

Title: 
COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY (CT) IN SMALL ANIMALS. PART 1. TECHNICAL ASPECTS
Author(s): 
I. Gielen, A. Van Caelenberg, H. van Bree
Abstract: 
Computed tomography (CT) is a cross-sectional imaging technique using x-rays and computers that is becoming increasingly available to veterinarians. During CT scanning, an x-ray tube rotates 360° around the patient. Multiple radiographic projections of a particular slice of tissue are made, and information from all projections is combined to create a single tomographic (slice) image. CT images provide accurate anatomic evaluation of tissue planes and regions that often cannot be visualized with conventional radiography. Whereas conventional radiographs have five radiographic opacities (metal, bone, soft tissues, fat, and air), CT systems can record thousands of separate opacities, ranging from air to high-density metal. Many imaging artifacts can occur in the process of generating CT images. A good understanding of these artifacts is necessary to enable an accurate interpretation of the CT images. After the scan examination, images in other planes can be produced using computerized reformatting, which is of help in evaluating the extent of a lesion. To increase the amount of soft tissue information, negative (air) and positive contrast agents (radiopaque iodine) can be used. Positive contrast techniques are of greatest importance for demonstrating brain tumors. Biopsies can also be obtained under CT guidance, a procedure that can be accurately performed.
Full text: 
pp 158-167
Theme

72 (6) 399-408

Title: 
DIAGNOSIS OF NASAL ASPERGILLOSIS IN THE DOG
Author(s): 
J.H. Saunders, H. van Bree
Abstract: 
Canine nasal aspergillosis is a common disease that continues to present a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. On physical examination, a profuse mucopurulent/hemorrhagic discharge, ulceration of the external nostrils, and facial pain or discomfort are the three most commonly encountered features. Hematology/chemistry is unrewarding. Serology, most commonly an agar gel double diffusion test, is easily performed and it has a very low rate of false positives (0-6%), but it may be falsely negative in the early stage of the disease. Imaging diagnosis of nasal aspergillosis is based on turbinate destruction, mucosal thickening and hyperostosis. Radiography is currently the most commonly used imaging technique, though its diagnostic value and reliability are still controversial. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance are promising emerging techniques. Rhinoscopy permits direct visualization of fungal colonies in 80 to 100% of the dogs and also has a therapeutic role. Culture is very hard to interpret, as 40% of nasal swabs of normal dogs and those with nasal neoplasia will yield Aspergillus. Cytology and histology show aspecific features in the absence of visualization of fungal hyphae, which occur in approximately 50% of the dogs.A definite diagnosis of nasal aspergillosis should reasonably be based on at least three positive diagnostic tests, including direct visualization of fungal colonies with rhinoscopy. Differentiation from other causes of chronic nasal disease is mainly based on the imaging findings, rhinoscopy and histology.
Full text: 
pp 399-408
Theme

72 (6) 396-398

Title: 
NASAL ASPERGILLOSIS ASSOCIATED WITH AN IMPACTED CANINE TOOTH IN A BELGIAN SHEPHERD DOG
Author(s): 
J.H. Saunders, C. Clercx, J.L. Zonderland, O. Taeymans
Abstract: 
A 9-month-old Belgian shepherd dog was evaluated for chronic nasal discharge. Oral examination revealed the absence of the left upper canine tooth. Radiographs showed impaction of this tooth into the left nasal cavity with caudal displacement of the tooth root. Rhinoscopy demonstrated the presence of fungal colonies. The impacted tooth was surgically removed and the nasal cavity flushed with enilconazole 1%. No recurrence was observed during a follow-up period of two years.
Full text: 
pp 396-398
Theme

73 (5) 307-309

Title: 
Lead intoxication by ingestion of lead shot in racing pigeons (columbia livia)
Author(s): 
P. TAVERNIER, S. ROELS, K. BAERT, K. HERMANS, F. PASMANS
Abstract: 
Acute lead poisoning caused by ingestion of lead shot was diagnosed in two young racing pigeons thathad been feeding on a meadow where lead shot was available. One bird showing a blood level of 7000 μg/llead died despite calcium disodium EDTA treatment, while the other was saved.
Full text: 
pp 307-309
Theme

Pages