Case report(s)

English

83(4) 184-192

Title: 
Immunological deep dermal vasculitis in a cat
Author(s): 
S. GAISBAUER, S. VANDENABEELE, S. DAMINET, D. PAEPE
Abstract: 
  In this case report, a 13.5-year-old, neutered, female domestic shorthaired cat with immunological deep dermal vasculitis is described. The patient was presented with lethargy, fever, polydipsia, anorexia and swollen distal limbs. Dermatological examination revealed partial alopecia, pitting edema and painfulness in all distal limbs. Several diagnostic examinations were conducted to confirm the suspected diagnosis and to look for possible triggers of cutaneous vasculitis. Morphological changes that were indicative for deep dermal vasculitis were seen during the histological examination of the skin. The other examinations did not reveal an underlying trigger or cause of the dermal vasculitis. The cat was diagnosed with immunological deep dermal vasculitis. The cat was treated with antibiotics, infusion, tube feeding and prednisolone. Improvement and healing of the dermal symptoms were only noticed after the start ofprednisolone therapy. 
Full text: 
pp 179-183
Case report(s)

83(4) 179-183

Title: 
Ultrasonografische en histopathologische bevindingen bij een uremische kat met maagadenocarcinoom
Author(s): 
M. ESMANS, A. LEGARRÉRÈS, A.BONGARTZ, F.CAROFIGLIO, M.HEIMANN, T. SCHWARZ
Abstract: 
 Gastric carcinoma is very rare in cats. In this case report, a gastric adenocarcinoma in achronically uremic cat is described. The cat presented with vomiting, dysorexia and weight loss.The ultrasound examination demonstrated an ultrasonographic pseudolayering effect on thegastric wall, which is suggested as a specific sign of adenocarcinoma. On histopathology, thisadenocarcinoma was organized, and a continuous intralymphatic infiltration line was visibleunderneath the muscularis mucosae, which might explain the pseudolayering effect. 
Full text: 
pp 179-183
Case report(s)

83 (3) 107-112

Title: 
Nervous system lymphoma with sciatic nerve involvement in two cats diagnosed using computed tomography and ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration
Author(s): 
G. Gory, J. Couturier, E. Cauvin, C. Fournel – Fleury, L. Couturier, D.N. Rault
Abstract: 
Two cats were presented with a recent history of difficulty in walking and jumping. Neurologicalexamination was consistent with a lumbosacral or a sciatic nerve lesion in both cases withan additional C6-T2 spinal cord segment lesion in case 2. Differential diagnosis included neoplastic,inflammatory/infectious (neuritis, meningomyelitis, discospondylitis) and compressivedisc disease. Computed tomography (CT) revealed an enlarged, contrast enhancing sciatic nervefrom the L7-S1 intervertebral foramen, to the distal third portion of the femoral shaft. In case 2,CT also revealed an enlarged femoral nerve and an extradural mass causing mild compressionof the spinal cord at T1-2 and T3-4. Ultrasonography allowed to perform fine needle aspirationof the affected sciatic nerve. Cytology was highly suggestive of indolent, small cell lymphoma incase 1, and confirmed a high-grade lymphoma in case 2, both belonging to the large granularlymphoma subtype.
Full text: 
pp 107-112
Case report(s)

2014 (2) 81-90

Title: 
The library of the first veterinary students (France, 18th century) - Part 2: from Bourgelat and Lafosse to the explosive development of agricultural and veterinary knowledge in the early 19th century
Author(s): 
P.E.J. BOLS, H.F.M. DE PORTE
Abstract: 
Excepting a few standard books on horses and horsemanship, no veterinary manuals were publishedbefore 1750 (cf. part 1 of this study by Bols and De porte (2014). This might not be surprising since noformal veterinary education was organized until the second half of the 18th century. In this second part,published information available to the students of the first veterinary school (Lyon, 1761) is described.In 1750, Bourgelat, founder of this school, published one of the first veterinary handbooks in modernhistory ‘Elemens d’Hippiatrique’ (1750-51-53), and his future opponent, Phillippe Etienne Lafosse,delighted the veterinary world with the publication of several outstanding books, among which hisfamous ‘Cours d’Hippiatrique’ (1772). As from then, veterinary medicine was no longer solely basedon empiricism, but gradually evolved to what might be called evidence-based medicine. Furthermore,the interest in species other than the horse emerged and increased. However, the hegemony of the horselasted until well beyond the 19th century. All this needs to be seen against the background of gradual butvery important social changes that ultimately led to the French Revolution. This turning point markedan explosion of knowledge of good farming practices in general and of the establishment of formalveterinary training more specifically.
Full text: 
pp 81-90
Case report(s)

2014 (2) 73-80

Title: 
Paraganglioma of a presumed celiac ganglion in a dog
Author(s): 
L. COUTURIER, P. GUILLAUMOT, J. DUBOY, G. GORY
Abstract: 
A 10-year-old French Bulldog was presented for acute vomiting. Ultrasonography andcomputed tomography of the abdomen revealed a well-delineated mass encircling the celiacartery, close to its emergence from the aorta. Surgery permitted complete excision of the mass.Histopathology combined with immunohistochemistry yielded the diagnosis of paraganglioma.
Full text: 
pp 73-80
Case report(s)

2014 (2) 66-72

Title: 
Treatment of a large thoracic wall tumor in a dog
Author(s): 
S. DEBEVERE, I. VAN DE MAELE, M. DE RIDDER, T. WAELBERS, I. GIELEN, H. DE ROOSTER, B. VAN GOETHEM
Abstract: 
A 12-year-old English Cocker spaniel was referred because of front leg lameness due to a mass onthe right cranioventral thoracic wall. Radiographic examination showed that the limited external masshad a large intrathoracic component. The patient was staged, and based on the results of computedtomography, surgery was planned and the tumor was removed en bloc. An osteosarcoma with metastasisin the regional lymph nodes was diagnosed on histopathology. Consequently, chemotherapy wasinstituted. The disease-free period lasted four months, after which respiratory discomfort developeddue to pulmonary metastases. The dog was euthanized five months after surgery.This case illustrates that a sufficiently aggressive, multimodal treatment may prolong life expectancyin case of an advanced, malignant tumor.
Full text: 
pp 66-72
Case report(s)

2014 (2) 60-65

Title: 
Pulmonary edema as a postoperative complication in two obese patients (a horse and a dog)
Author(s): 
S. MELIS, S. SCHAUVLIEGE, T. BOSMANS, F. GASTHUYS, I. POLIS
Abstract: 
In this case series, the development and successful treatment of pulmonary edema aredescribed in two obese animals (a horse and a dog) in the postoperative period. This rare butsevere complication is normally fairly easy to diagnose, but the cause is usually multifactorialand difficult to determine. Potentially contributing factors are discussed. Both animals respondedsuccessfully to therapy and were discharged without further incidents.    
Full text: 
pp 60-65
Case report(s)

2014 (2) 53-59

Title: 
Diagnosis and ultrasound-guided retrieval of a vaginal foreign body in a dog and a cat
Author(s): 
L. Gatel, G. Gory, B. De Pauw, D.N. Rault
Abstract: 
In this case report, the diagnosis and ultrasound-guided retrieval of an intravaginal grassawn in a dog and a cat are described. The dog was presented with chronic vaginal discharge forover two years. The cat was presented for acute lethargy and bloody vaginal discharge and atwo-week history of a perivulvar leakage. Ultrasonographic diagnosis included the visualizationof a linear, hyperechoic and spindle-shaped structure and mild thickness of the vagina. The grassawns were successfully retrieved non-invasively, under general anesthesia using ultrasoundguidedHartmann forceps inserted into the vagina. Ultrasound-guided grass awn retrieval fromthe vagina appears to be a safe and inexpensive procedure.
Full text: 
pp 53-59
Case report(s)

2014 (1) 36-41

Title: 
Localized steatitis as a complication after dystocia in a mare
Author(s): 
E. Claes, C. De Schauwer, M. Hoogewijs, D. De Clercq, V. Saey, J. Govaere
Abstract: 
In this article, a case of localized steatitis is reported at the level of the perivaginal adipose tissueafter dystocia in a mare. Although the mare initially recovered well postpartum, she died a few dayslater. At the second consultation, a knobby bump was present at both sides of the vaginal wall on vaginalexamination. The intravaginal opening of these bumps was associated with the outflow of pus containingyellow-brown pieces of necrotic adipose tissue. Later on, steatitis at the level of the ligamentaevesicae and a bladder rupture were also observed at necropsy. These disorders probably accelerated theclinical symptoms resulting in shock.Generally, two types of steatitis are differentiated: localized and generalized steatitis. While only onefat depot is affected in the localized form, the disease involves several fat depots in the generalized form.Localized steatitis at the level of the perivaginal adipose tissue has not yet been described in the horse.
Full text: 
pp 36-41
Case report(s)

2014 (1) 28-35

Title: 
Two cases of patent ductus arteriosus in the dog
Author(s): 
S. Debevere, L. Vlerick, V. Bavegems, D. Binst, P. Cornillie, I. Polis, H. de Rooster
Abstract: 
 Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is one of the most common congenital heart disorders in dogs. If thecondition is not corrected, more than half of the affected dogs die within their first year of life. Closureof the PDA by occlusion or ligation is therefore recommended and has a good long-term prognosis. Themain complication of the non-invasive techniques is embolism, whereas bleeding after rupture of theductus or an adjacent blood vessel is the most common problem with ligation.Two cases of PDA are discussed. In the first dog, the PDA was successfully corrected surgically. Inthe second case, however, serious bleeding occurred at several occasions during the surgery due to theexceptional presence of a persistent fifth aortic arch (PFAA). Intraoperative euthanasia was performed.
Full text: 
pp 28-35
Case report(s)

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