2019 - 88 (6)

Original article(s)

Case report(s)

  • T. HELLEBUYCK, L. GEERINCKX, J. SIMARD, M. VERLINDEN, A. VAN CAELENBERG
    An atypical case of proventricular dilatation in a Red-and-green Macaw (Ara chloropterus)
    pp 316-319 - abstract - PDF icon artikel02English.pdf
  • Z. JOOSTENS, L. VANSLAMBROUCK, H. DE COCK, T. MARIËN
    Epithelial inclusion cyst of the equine digital flexor tendon sheath: diagnosis by ultrasonography and magnetic resonance and successful treatment by tenoscopy
    pp 320-326 - abstract - PDF icon artikel03English.pdf
  • S. ALONSO-SOUSA, M. DE RIJCK, M. LORES, J. BRUNSTING
    Clinical management of gastroduodenitis and equine gastric ulcer syndrome grade IV of unknown origin in an Arabian mareA two-year-old Arabian filly was referred with symptons of colic. Clinical examination revealed signs associated with endotoxemia. Ultrasonographic examination of the abdomen demonstrated severe distention of the stomach and distended loops of small intestine with reduced motility. With nasogastric intubation, eight liters of hemorrhagic reflux were retrieved. Gastroscopic examination showed a severe degree of gastric ulceration scored as equine gastric ulcer syndrome (EGUS) grade IV. Based on these findings, EGUS and gastroduodenitis (GD) were diagnosed. Initially, the horse was treated using parenteral pantoprazole, which was supplemented by adding enteral ranitidine and sucralfate when the horse ceased refluxing. The horse was discharged eleven days after presentation with a 75%-healing of the gastric ulcers. A control gastroscopic examination was performed thirty days after discharge showing a 90%-healing (EGUS Grade I). To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first case report in which pantoprazole in combination with ranitidine and sucralfate has been used to treat a severe degree of gastric ulceration.
    pp 327-334 - abstract - PDF icon artikel04English.pdf

Continuing professional development

  • C. BRONDEEL, E. COPPIETERS, E. DE BAKKER, E. BOGAERTS, L. DE RYCKE, Y. SAMOY, G. VERHOEVEN, B. VAN RYSSEN
    Meniscal injuries in the dogMeniscal injuries in the dog are nearly always seen in combination with a cranial cruciate ligament rupture. The medial meniscus is, by far, most commonly affected. Clinical signs indicative for a meniscal tear are severe lameness or a sudden increase of lameness in dogs with a cranial cruciate rupture. Persistent or recurrent lameness after cranial cruciate surgery can equally be caused by a meniscal tear. Different imaging techniques can demonstrate a meniscal lesion, or also arthroscopic or direct inspection via arthrotomy may show the lesion. There are several surgical treatment options.
    pp 335-341 - abstract - PDF icon artikel05Dutch.pdf

Veterinary past

In practice

  • M. ALUWÉ, S. MILLET, A. VAN DEN BROEKE
    In welke mate beïnvloedt de voederstrategie de smakelijkheid van varkensvlees?
    pp 346-347 - abstract - PDF icon uitdepraktijk.pdf